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The Short Family: An American Tragedy

On December 16, 1945 a mysterious fire killed an African American family of four. O’Day Short, his wife Helen, and children Barry (8) and Carol Ann (7), lost their lives when their home exploded. Over 70 years since the firebombing of the African Americans’ family home, the mystery still exists as to the exact circumstances

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Should We ‘Scrap’ Black History Month? Part 3: Inland Empire Residents Respond

Several Inland Empire residents were asked to share their opinions about the celebration of Black History Month. They were asked specifically if they thought Black History Month was still relevant in 2017, and to include why or why not.   Ypyani L, Fontana resident said: “No, Black History Month [BHM] is not irrelevant; we need

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Should We ‘Scrap’ Black History Month? Part 2: A Perspective Offered by Jason L. Riley, Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow

Jason L. Riley is a Manhattan Institute senior fellow and Wall Street Journal contributor, and the author of “Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make it Harder for Blacks to Succeed” and “False Black Power.”   In an opinion article for the Wall Street Journal, Riley wrote that because we had a Black President, and

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Should We “Scrap” Black History Month? Part 1: A Question Posed by Cynthia Tucker, Reporter

Cynthia Tucker, a reporter, wrote in an article titled, “Scrap Black History Month,” that the celebration of black history and contributions is “quaint, old fashioned like a rotary dial telephone, or rabbit ears on a television set.” She stated that Black History month is no longer needed because of the achievements we have made as

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African American Women in the Armed Forces, Part 3: World War II

World War II began in 1939, but America did not enter the war until December 7, 1941, when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. At the time, African American female soldiers were still officially segregated in basic training, dining as well as living arrangements.   Racial discrimination was finally abolished in the armed forces by Executive Order

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Lu Vason, Bill Pickett Black Rodeo Founder, and the African American Cowboy Legacy (1861-1900)

Lu Vason was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, and he grew up in Berkley, California. He began his working career as a hairdresser and barber; later he became a music promoter. Vason promoted groups like the Pointer Sisters and The Whispers.   When Vason moved to Denver, Colorado in 1977, he toured the Black American

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African American Women in the Armed Forces, Part 2: The Civil War (1861-1865)

During the Civil War (1861-1865), many black nurses served in the Confederate as well as the Union Army. Due to the racism that was embedded in the country, and reflected in the army, all black men and women were segregated from the white enlistees. They neither ate, slept, nor interacted socially.   Susie King Taylor,

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African American Women in the Armed Forces, Part 1: Cathay Williams AKA William Cathay, the First Known Black Female Soldier

It is almost impossible to discuss African American Women in the Armed Forces without mentioning the very first known Black female soldier, Cathay Williams, also known as William Cathay. Cathay, born November 4, 1842, was an enslaved young woman who was emancipated by Union Soldiers after her owner died. When the Civil War broke out,

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Women’s History: Sarah Breedlove aka Madam C.J. Walker – Entrepreneur, Philanthropist, Activist (December 23, 1867-May 20, 1919)

[Image retrieved from: http://www.philanthropyroundtable.org/almanac/hall_of_fame/madam_c._j._walker]

Sarah Breedlove, AKA Madam C.J. Walker, was an African American businesswoman, and one of the first self-made millionaires of any race or gender. Born in Delta, Louisiana, just two years after the Civil war ended, Sarah became an orphan at 7, a wife at 14, a mother at 17, and a widow at 19.  

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Part IV: San Bernardino Black Athletes Hall of Fame, 1983 to 1985

In its eleventh year, the San Bernardino Black Athletes Hall of Fame Committee officially established the Tom Hester Female Athlete of the Year Award – eleven years after the passage of Title IX, an Education Amendment to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. While the amendment made no mention of sports, it had a wide-ranging

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